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  Dec 17, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 UMass Dartmouth Undergraduate Catalog

Department of Crime and Justice Studies


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Faculty and Fields of Interest

Viviane Saleh-Hanna (Department Chairperson) (associate professor) History of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Black Feminism, Hauntology, Prison/Carceral Tourism, Anti-Colonialism and Abolition.

Tammi Arford (assistant professor) punishment and social control; knowledge, power and resistance; carceral tourism; aesthetics; media and popular culture

Heather Donovan (full-time lecturer) crime and justice studies, family violence, juvenile justice

Susan Krumholz (full professor) crime and justice; theories of crime, law and society; domestic violence; women’s studies

Eric Larson (assistant professor) hemispheric American Studies; comparative race and ethnicity; neoliberalism; labor; transnational social movements; comparative political culture

Dennis Roderick (full-time lecturer) crime and justice studies, sexual assault, victimization, forensic psychology

Heather Turcotte (assistant professor) African, African American and Africana studies; American and critical ethnic studies; community herbalism and environmental studies; critical legal studies; geopolitics and international studies; feminist studies; transnational social justice and abolitionism; transdisciplinary methods

Tryon Woods (associate professor) critical race;  gender, and sex studies; African diaspora; punishment and policing; political and symbolic economies of structural violence and globalization

Erin Katie Krafft (assistant professor) Transnational feminist and resistance movements; culture and society under socialism, post-socialism, and Communism; literatures of survival and resistance; the politicization of motherhood, family, and private life; social theories of power and control.

Brian Broadrose (assistant professor). Race and ethnicity, racism, Indigenous archaeology, NAGPRA and Repatriation, Museum Studies, the culture of anthropology, critical theory, feminist theory, punk rock, Situationist perspectives, social movements, transformative social justice.

Part Time Lecturers

Mia Rowland

Jean Robertson

Department of Crime and Justice Studies Mission

Crime and Justice Studies is an innovative department offering courses that are up-to-date with recent events, trends, struggles and developments. The program provides national and international studies on issues of criminal justice, social justice, restorative justice and transformative justice, genocide and war crimes. These include questions of critical inquiry (what is crime, what is justice and how is it pursed) as well as comprehensive analyses of structural, institutional, and State violence.

The major is interdisciplinary and draws on social and ethical consideration across the University while providing rigorous intellectual challenges. Our students study the social ethical considerations unique to the fields of crime and justice. Our education goal is to provide students with new opportunities to combine a university education with enhanced avenues for intellectual development, career advancement and public service and social service.

Admission into the Major

Students seeking admission to Crime and Justice Studies must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.0.

Students interested in majoring in Crime and Justice Studies must schedule an interview with the Chair of the Crime and Justice Studies Program for permission to enter the program, to discuss the program requirements and to arrange for a permanent advisor.

Minimum Requirements for Graduation:

To successfully complete the program for graduation, all students must:

  • Maintain a minimum of a 2.75 GPA in the major
  • Maintain a minimum of a 2.0 GPA overall 
  • Meet the CJS major requirements listed below
  • Complete 30 credits at 300/400 level (including all courses in the major except Experiential Learning)
  • Complete a minimum of 120 credits with at least 45 at UMass Dartmouth
  • Complete the University Studies requirements
  • Complete the distribution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences
  • All courses counting for the major must be completed with a C- or higher
  • Complete all required CJS core courses, 4 CJS electives within the Crime and Justice Studies department.

To successfully complete the program for graduation through the pre-2012 requirements [this is only available to students who were registered in the program before Fall 2012], students must:

  • Maintain a minimum of a 2.75 GPA in the major
  • Maintain a minimum of a 2.0 GPA overall 
  • Meet the CJS major requirements listed below
  • Complete 30 credits at 300/400 level (including all courses in the major except Experiential Learning)
  • Complete a minimum of 120 credits with at least 45 at UMass Dartmouth
  • Complete the University Studies requirements
  • Complete the distribution requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences
  • All courses counting for the major must be completed with a C- or higher
  • Complete all required CJS core courses, 3 CJS electives within the Crime and Justice Studies department and 4 interdisciplinary courses in the social sciences or humanities

Student Learning Goals

Discipline-specific:

  • Understanding systems of inequality and the dynamics of local and global distributions of power;
  • Understanding the constructed and institutionalized natures of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation and culture;
  • Understanding basic theoretical arguments in crime and justice studies;
  • Critical understanding of social scientific approaches to research, sound research designs and basic social scientific research methods; and
  • Ability to apply knowledge from discipline-specific research and theory to issues in their lives and communities.

General skills:

  • Present organized, coherent arguments through developed public speaking and academic writing skills
  • Understand and critically evaluate social-scientific work
  • Ability to assemble relevant published background research, critically evaluate the research, and integrate it into an argument.

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